Network 19 timetables for integrated bus and light rail released

The Public Transport Association of Canberra looks forward to Canberras first integrated public transport timetable
Transport Canberra today released the first integrated light rail and bus timetable for Canberra, which will commence in late April when light rail is also operational. The Public Transport Association of Canberra (PTCBR) are looking forward to its introduction, and its potential to increase access to public transport by more Canberrans than the current network.

PTCBR Chair Damien Haas said that “The benefits of the new network are in its greater reach, its complete redesign to take in newer suburbs, later running, much earlier starts, and extended Sunday evening services. The extended Sunday services will also benefit major events in Canberra held on public holidays, where many bus services finished at around 7PM.”

“The negatives include cuts to some areas such as to the Belconnen CIT, the ANU, the free City Loop.”

“There is also a continuing lack of integration with Queanbeyan where a simple extension of a rapid service into Queanbeyans main street could help both cities.” Mr Haas said.

Some areas are no longer served by buses as the stop distance has been increased from 400 metres to in some instances 800 metres. The PTCBR hope to see a rapid rollout of new bus stops with improved facilities such as covered shelters, realtime information displays and the ability for passengers to depart from the front and rear bus doors.

The PTCBR would also like to see future public transport links into Queanbeyan and nearby regional towns in NSW such as Googong, Jerrabomberra, Yass, Goulburn and Murrumbateman.

Mr Haas said that “Overall, the benefits far outweigh the negatives and as future stages of light rail are delivered, more bus kilometers will be released to increase local bus frequency. Passengers like the rapid bus network and frequency, and patronage in this area has driven the further development of rapid routes.”

The increased passenger capacity and frequency of light rail will be welcome on the Gungahlin rapid route, where rapid buses were no longer able to cope with passenger numbers experienced during peak hours.

Mr Haas also said that “The new network is a radical departure from decades old bus routes that Canberrans have become used to, and this will cause some disruption in peoples routines as they adjust to the new network. The benefits of more frequent rapid buses and light rail will become obvious as passengers get used to the new network”.

“The PTCBR were pleased to see Transport Canberra respond to feedback from the community and restore services to Hume and Campbell Park, and woudl like to see a similar limited service restored to Fairbairn, the ANU and the Bruce CIT.”
On the need to change buses to complete journeys, Mr Haas said that “While some passengers will need to change buses to get onto a rapid bus or light rail, to complete a journey, the increased frequency will mean that their overall journey times may be shorter than present.”

We encourage all passengers to look at the new timetable and routes, take advantage of the free month of bus and light rail use, and let Transport Canberra know how the new network works for them, and how it can be improved in the future.
The PTCBR expect that Transport Canberra will fine tune some parts of the network, in response to passenger feedback. Mr Haas said that he looked forward to stepping off a local bus and onto light rail at the end of April.

Damien Haas is the Chair of the Public Transport Association of Canberra, the Canberra regions peak public transport users lobby group.

PTCBR welcomes Labors 200 million dollar commitment to light rail stage two

MEDIA RELEASE from the PUBLIC TRANSPORT ASSOCIATION OF CANBERRA – AUTHORISED FOR PUBLICATION by D.C. Haas

The Public Transport Association of Canberra (PTCBR) welcomes Labors 200 million dollar commitment to light rail

The Federal Labor party today committed 200 million dollars to the Woden to Civic light rail project, if it is elected in the May federal election. Federal Opposition Leader Bill Shorten MP made the funding committment at a media function at the Alinga St light rail terminal on March 12 with the Chief Minister Andrew Barr, Transport Minister Meegan Fitzharris and ALP Candidate Alicia Payne in attendance.

The PTCBR are pleased at this announcement, and welcome the support by the federal Labor party for a territory public transport project, especially as the light rail will serve the building that the federal Parliament sits in, and the 12 thousand workers in the Parliamentary zone.

“Considering the minimal support to date from the Australian Government to a public transport project that would benefit them, it is incredibly pleasing to see a different attitude towards Canberra and its public transport needs, from a party vying for government”. Damien Haas, Chair of the PTCBR said today. “It’s also great to see a funding announcement for public transport, instead of another road project”.

“Just as important as the funding announcement, is the political support for the light rail project, that may require parliamentary approval if the Barton deviation is chosen instead of the State Circle option. The Barton deviation would require endorsement by the NCA and both houses of parliament.”

“A change of government may also make the National Capital Authority (NCA) easier to negotiate with if it knew the federal parliament was amenable to either route.”

Mr Haas went on to say that “When the Woden to Civic light rail project is completed, the road congestion and parking conflict that the area experiences whenever a major event such as Enlighten is held, will be radically improved. Light rail will provide fast, safe and comfortable access to not just the workplaces in Parkes and Barton, but the national attractions that locals and all Australians visit that area for.

Mr Haas said that the PTCBR look forward to other candidates for the federal election announcing their policies on public transport as soon as possible, so that voters could make an informed decision.

Damien Haas is the Chair of the Public Transport Association of Canberra, the Canberra regions peak public transport users lobby group.

Canberra Metro Light Rail depot at Mitchell now operational

Canberra Metro Mitchell Depot light rail vehicle railyard.
Canberra Metro Mitchell Depot light rail vehicle railyard.

Canberra Metro hosted a small media function on Friday march 1st to show off the completed Mitchell light rail depot that will house the first fourteen light rail vehicles (LRV’s) for Canberras light rail network. Located in Mitchell, about half way along the route, the light rail depot contains a control centre, a workshop, offices, cleaning facilities and a rail yard. It has taken 31 months from sod turning to becoming fully operational (although it has been used as a workshop for around a year).

The light rail control centre has realtime monitoring of LRV’s, and of the CCTV on the vehicles and at stations along the line. All vehicles are monitored, and their location along the network can be observed from several different types of linked software. LRV operating parameters can also be monitored. Audio messages can be made to one or all vehicles from the control centre. Intersections along the route are also under CCTV monitoring, so any collisions can be monitored, and emergency vehicles despatched.

At the media event, Minister Meegan Fitzharris MLA said that she was confident that light rail operations would commence in April. There will be a free weekend of public transport across Canberra (I think this means that light rail will commence on a Saturday) when this occurs.

Canberra Metro CEO Glenn Stockton discussed the regulatory approvals process, saying he was confident that the light rail route would gain approval for a late April commencement of operation.

Between now and the opening date, the ACT Government and Canberra Metro (who have built the network) must sign off on contractual requirements. In addition the federal government regulator must sign off on the licence to operate an electrical network, and accreditation to operate a passenger railway.

Canberra Metro operations has received a rebranding and will be known as CMET. Some of the customer relations staff attending the opening, had CMET branding on their clothes.

The media covered the opening and the announcement that new traffic arrangement around light rail and road intersections now apply.

abc canb lr depot 1 mar 19

ABC Canberra published a Facebook post here.

The Canberra Times published an article here.

abc depot 1 mar 19

ABC Canberra TV News report on the depot opening (click here)

nine news lrv 1 mar

Nine TV News report on the depot opening (click here)

win lr 1 mar

WIN Canberra TV News report on the depot opening (click here)

The following photos of the Depot including the Control Centre, were taken on March 1st 2019.

Transport Minister Meegan Fitzharris talking to media representatives covering the Depot opening
Transport Minister Meegan Fitzharris talking to media representatives covering the Depot opening
Canberra Metro CEO Glenn Stockton talking to media representatives covering the Depot opening
Canberra Metro CEO Glenn Stockton talking to media representatives covering the Depot opening
Canberra Metro operations are rebranding to CMET
Canberra Metro operations are rebranding to CMET
Canberra Metro operations control centre at the Mitchell Depot
Canberra Metro operations control centre at the Mitchell Depot

lr depot 6lr depot 7lr depot 8lr depot 9

View from the control centre of the entrance and exit from the Mitchell light rail depot to Flemington Rd. Thats a large substation and in front of that is the track into and out of the workshop area.
View from the control centre of the entrance and exit from the Mitchell light rail depot to Flemington Rd. Thats a large substation and in front of that is the track into and out of the workshop area.
That large cylinder is a sand tower. Sand is used in the braking system to enhance friction between steel wheels and steel tracks, in an emergency. The building next to the carpark is the backup control centre. In the background the railyard, that houses the 14 light rail vehicles in our current fleet.
That large cylinder is a sand tower. Sand is used in the braking system to enhance friction between steel wheels and steel tracks, in an emergency. The building next to the carpark is the backup control centre. In the background the railyard, that houses the 14 light rail vehicles in our current fleet.
The light rail workshop
The light rail workshop
The light rail workshop
The light rail workshop
Behind the LRV is the washing shed. All LRV's will be washed, before being stabled for the night.
Behind the LRV is the washing shed. All LRV’s will be washed, before being stabled for the night.
A map of the track inside the Mitchell LRV Depot showing the exit onto Flemington Rd
A map of the track inside the Mitchell LRV Depot showing the exit onto Flemington Rd

lr depot 17lr depot 18

This shunter moves LRV's in and out of the workshop. It can be operated by a person walking alongside it with a remote control.
This shunter moves LRV’s in and out of the workshop. It can be operated by a person walking alongside it with a remote control.
In the background the LRV fleet in its railyard. Future plans include covering the yard, and expanding it (to the right) when the LRV fleet expands for future stages.
In the background the LRV fleet in its railyard. Future plans include covering the yard, and expanding it (to the right) when the LRV fleet expands for future stages.

To stay up to date with all public transport and planning issues in Canberra,join the PTCBR here and visit our Facebook Group.